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redeyedtreefr0g
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Writing Challenge February 2014 - Kerala

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 9:41 pm

The challenge was issued by me: to take 28 songs from a random playlist or Pandora shuffle, and use those songs as the inspiration to write a short story (Wow-related only) each day for the month of February, my birthday month.

edit: All stories have been posted! Feel free to leave comments here if you like, I always love hearing what people think, good or bad.

  1. Sahara
  2. Angels
  3. So Far Away
  4. Stand Up
  5. Moves Like Jagger
  6. Everybody Talks
  7. Don't You Worry Child
  8. Counting Stars
  9. Wasting My Time
  10. How You Remind Me
  11. In The End
  12. Fake It
  13. Dragula
  14. Enough
  15. Its Been Awhile
  16. Cold
  17. Time of Dying
  18. Faint
  19. If Everyone Cared
  20. Whispers In The Dark
  21. When September Ends
  22. Always
  23. Don't Trust Me
  24. Just One Yesterday
  25. Higher
  26. Californication
  27. Bleed It Out
  28. Feel Good Drag
Last edited by redeyedtreefr0g on September 24th, 2015, 11:53 am, edited 7 times in total.
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 9:57 pm

01 Sahara Nightwish

The sound of hoof beats was rythmic, relentless and steady. The noise reverberated, echoed, grew louder. The hoof beats became deafening thunder.

The orc jerked awake in panic, breathing haggard and fast, eyes wide, arms raised to protect against the crushing stampede that did not exist. Realizing the reality of the silence around him, he unfolded himself hastily and crawled to the top of the hollow he'd been sheltering in. The sand was still warm from the blistering heat of daylight, but the air was rapidly cooling. Stars shone above beautifully, and the moon was bright, but the orc cared nothing for them, scanning the surrounding land for signs of pursuit. Paranoid, he searched, the echoes of his nightmare fading slowly. The day's wind had mostly erased the clumsy trail of footprints leading to him.

They were coming, and he knew it. He wondered if the berserk shape-shifter was with them, tracking his scent, leading the charge. He'd seen her tear apart a warlock yesterday. A warlock! With his demon too. What chance did one stupid grunt have against that? He prayed for packhounds only, or better yet no tracking beasts at all.

Seeing nothing out on the sands, the orc searched again, unsure. The panicky urge to move was strong, though. He imagined prey felt this way in the presence of a predator.

He was a prairie dog.
They were the worgs.

He ran.

The orc's legs pumped fast, his feet flying across sands that seemed to suck at his every step. Often he didn't pull a foot out from the shifting grit fast enough, and he went tumbling down. He would regain his feet as fast as he could, fleeing for his life. If he could reach the Coven, he would be safe. If.

Hoofbeats sounded faintly in his ears over the whisper of moving sand. Frantic, he ran faster, trying to orient where the sound came from, and if it was real. Lack of water had caused him to be plagued with waking dreams that looked, sounded, felt, smelled every bit real, until they suddenly dissolved.

Then he heard the laughing, and he knew it was real. The hyenas never made it into his dreams. Only the crushing centaur hooves, the spears, but mostly the furious eyes and wicked claws and bloodied teeth of the shape-shifter.

Another glance back revealed the truth. Dark shapes swarmed over the dim purple horizon like an ocean tidal wave. His doom raced toward him riding thunder like the curse of an angry god.

The orc suddenly knew why hyenas laughed. He could not contain the cackle as he still ran, the sound bubbling out him, hysterical and crazed.


Kerala stared up at the beautiful stars, winking from everywhere above her. Sleep eluded her, though her belly was full. A hunting party had left in a flurry of hooves and paws, whoops and war cries and excited barks. The chase was on, for a prisoner had escaped, and this was their favorite game.

The rope around her neck chafed, but they had learned by now that she would attempt escape at every opportunity. There was the very real chance that she was one they could not catch, if she ran, and so they guarded her closely.

The constellations were slowly returning to the places Kerala had memorized. Every day brought them closer, and she judged that in three more moons, the count would be up to three.

Kerala pulled her large fur blanket closer against the chilling air, feeling the soft fur against her hands. She watched the stars twinkling in the night.

A ballad of dark queen echoes through night
As he flees the curse of gods, the pharaoh's wrath

One thousand one nights unseen
The philosopher and the queen

Ancient mariner in a sea of sand
The burning beauty his tomb to die for

One thousand one nights unseen
The philosopher and the queen

Horizon's swarming with death
Run!

Heaven has a darkened face
Dunes are soaring, as on a chase
Caravan of the cursed
Chasing him across the waves

May he now rest under aegis of mirage
As the sands slowly turn to Elysian fields

One thousand one nights unseen
The philosopher and the queen
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:01 pm

02 Angels Within Temptation

A thin and winding trail cut through the deep snow, worn muddy down to bare stones by countless feet. Flanking the trail to either side were tattered declarations of the town's ownership, stiff with last night's freezing drizzle. The violet banners standing vigil were emblazoned with the broken mask and triplicate arrows of the Forsaken.

Uphill, the trail led to dark stone buildings. Freshly fallen white snow and ice became dirty slush and piles stained green or purple, grudgingly pushed aside to make room within the town's boundaries. Great wagons with frosty vessels of green liquid stood anywhere there was room, half-buried and forlorn. Sinister. Undead shuffled about the town, attending to various duties. Bats hung shivering upside-down from their circular perch, awaiting travelers. The music of Venomspite was the scrape of bone and hooves on stone,, soft rasping voices, the snap-cracking of lightning from one of the many rods on a rooftop, and the occasional cackle of an alchemist.

But, not far down the trail, where the snow was still powdery and unsullied, two figures could be seen still, imprinted in the white and temporarily fossilized in a layer of thin ice. Side by side, humanoid in shape, with great bell-shaped bottoms and wide sweeping arcs to either side. The figures were one large, one small, and right beside the path to bleak Venomspite.

Many travelers saw them. And they wondered.

Sparkling angel I believed
you were my savior in my time of need.
Blinded by faith I couldn't hear
all the whispers, the warnings so clear.

I see the angels,
I'll lead them to your door.
There's no escape now,
no mercy no more.
No remorse cause I still remember
the smile when you tore me apart.
You took my heart,
deceived me right from the start.
You showed me dreams,
I wished they'd turn into real.
You broke the promise and made me realize.
It was all just a lie (just a lie).

Sparkling angel, I couldn't see
your dark intentions, your feelings for me.
Fallen angel, tell me why.
What is the reason, the thorn in your eye?

I see the angels,
I'll lead them to your door
There's no escape now
no mercy no more
No remorse cause I still remember
the smile when you tore me apart
You took my heart,
deceived me right from the start.
You showed me dreams,
I wished they'd turn into real.
You broke the promise and made me realize.
It was all just a lie.

Could have been forever.
Now we have reached the end.

This world may have failed you,
it doesn't give you reason why.
You could have chosen a different path in life.
The smile when you tore me apart.

You took my heart,
deceived me right from the start.
You showed me dreams,
I wished they'd turn into real.
You broke the promise and made me realize.
It was all just a lie.

Could have been forever.
Now we have reached the end.


This song was hard for me- I wasn't sure what to do about it until a day after it should have been written, when I was biking home from work in the snow. Then of course the answer was simple: snow angels!
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:05 pm

03 So Far Away Staind

There was so much green.

Kerala stared around her in awe at the wondrous place in which she suddenly found herself. The air was heavy with smells of flowers and fresh water, the chorus of frogs and crickets. Giant trees towered above her, providing a glowing green shade. Every breath felt revitalizing in a way she had never known. She'd forgotten that the world was not all dust and wind.

She walked slowly around the glade, marveling, her assigned Warden trailing at a respectful distance. Kerala leaned heavily on a walking stick, atop which was a pouch of liquid with a tiny tube spiraling down in a glistening strand to disappear beneath bandages on her hand and wrist. The healers would prefer that she stay abed, but she was stronger than her frail appearance would lead one to believe, and eventually her refusal to cooperate won out. It had amused her to see their surprised faces.

Kerala touched everything.

She prodded plants with her stick, leaned on the rough bark of trees. She pet the amazing beasts which were a combination of bird and horse. She swirled the chill waters with a hand, drank the sweet pure liquid. She traced the grain pattern in the buildings' wooden walls. Each time she touched something, tasted, smelled, turned to see her surroundings, was verification that this place was real.

She stayed outdoors as much as she could, walked as much as she could. Her own weakness appalled her. She had to stop and sit often. The inability to stomach solid food was also a surprise, and the bag she carried had some form of liquid nourishment. They said she'd nearly starved to death, that no one they'd seen had ever been so close. They told her she was a strong patient and had responded to care better than most. Kerala was not surprised by that. She'd been fighting to survive for so long that even without conscious thought, the battle was ongoing.

They urged her to sleep. Kerala resisted as much as she could, though not because she wanted to be obstinate. She very dearly wished to lay still and sleep peacefully on the soft greenery beside the stream. But a new emotion plagued her, rooted deep and a part of her unlike anything she'd felt.

Fear.

Fear that she would lay down here and then the vision would end, and she'd wake up in the black mine. Fear that she wouldn't find another gem to trade for food. Fear that this time, wounds were festering beyond her body's ability to overcome, that this was all a fever-dream.

She had to admit though, that she felt SO alive. How could this be a dream? She could see better than she'd been able to in a long time. The fog of her mind had been cleared as if a storm had come through and swept it all aside, leaving nothing but crackling clear newness.

It was hard to believe, standing here, that not so far away was an entirely different world. She turned her back on it, stepping slowly among the flowers, reaching out to touch one.

This is my life,
its not what it was before.
All these feelings I've shared
And these are my dreams
that I'd never lived before.

Somebody shake me 'cause I,
I must be sleeping.

[chorus]
Now that we're here,
so far away,
all the struggle we thought was in vain
all the mistakes,
one life contained,
they all finally start to go away.
Now that we're here so far away
and I feel like I can face the day
and I can forgive and I'm not ashamed
to be the person that I am today.

These are my words
that I've never said before
“I think I'm doing okay.”
And this is the smile
that I've never shown before.

Somebody shake me 'cause I,
I must be sleeping.

[chorus]

I'm so afraid of waking
please don't shake me
afraid of waking
please don't shake me

[chorus]
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:07 pm

04 Stand Up Fireflight

Wadulisi was the first to stand.

The firelight flickered and flared as sap popped and sent embers soaring upward. The light reflected from her golden eyes, making them glow in the darkness. Reflections glittered from the wet trails on her cheeks. The other tribe members gathered around the fire looked around at each other, waiting for others to cast their votes. Slowly, with each one looking uncomfortable and ashamed, individuals cast their votes.

These broken and battered souls belonged to a tribe of tauren who had been steadily fleeing. They were hounded by a strong tribe of centaur hunters and their tracking beasts. The braves had successfully defended their people for weeks, but a few days ago, they'd suffered the heaviest losses yet. Nearly half of their number were missing now, brutally slaughtered or worse, taken captive.

Wadulisi's mate and daughter were gone.

She stood in the firelight, watching the others make their decisions The vote was whether or not to run a suicidal rescue mission, on whether or not to abandon their children, mates or parents. Standing meant running. Wadulisi was voting to run, to take her remaining daughter and flee as if her family were already dead. Everyone knew that her mate and daughter had been taken prisoner. Everyone knew that centaur were cannibals, and that it was likely that their loved ones would be eaten, but not for weeks or months. But everyone also knew that turning back would likely mean death for all of them.

Wadulisi watched as her grieving brothers and sisters of the people made their choice. Eventually, everyone stood standing, silent. Even those who had argued the loudest for a counterstrike stood now, the scout's report of numbers and movements disheartening. They had no chance.

The two remaining elders nodded to their assembled charges, and the orders went out to be ready to travel at dawn. The meeting slowly dissolved.

Wadulisi entered the tent that was hers, seeming so empty now. Her daughter was curled up tightly on the sleeping mat, blanket pulled as tight as possible around her. The silver fur on her face was damp still from crying earlier. Her long hair was messy in its braids, the plaits not having been redone in days. She vowed that tomorrow she'd have the girl sit still long enough to do that.

The child needed her to be strong for them now more than ever. She'd lost friends before, people she knew. But now her lifelong companion, her twin sister, was gone, along with her father. Wadulisi clenched her jaw, determined to stem the wave of emotion that came with that thought. She still had one child, and she intended for the two of them to live.

She carefully untucked the blanket from her daughter's back and cuddled close behind her. She resisted the urge to crush her child in a hug, and instead closed her eyes, determined to sleep. She would need it, for tomorrow they would run some more.

Wadulisi was still trying to find sleep when she saw the first rays of golden dawn light cutting through the night.

Look at all the lonely hearts
Shivering out in the dark
Hiding from the truth
Cover up the proof

Demons that I've tried to hide
Imprison me in my own lies
And all that I can do is cover up the proof

Don't be afraid to

[chorus]
(Stand up)
Stand up if you're broken
(Stand up)
Stand up if you feel ashamed
You are not alone when you hurt this way
(Stand up)
Stand up if you need love
(Stand up)
This is not Judgment Day
You don't have to hide, there's no need to run
Everything will be okay

Secrets got me torn apart
Trying to destroy my heart
But I can see the light
It's cutting through the night

Don't run away
(Don't run away)
Don't be afraid to

[chorus]

You say you love me
That's all I'll ever need
If you say I'm good enough
That's good enough for me

[chorus]

(Stand up)
Look at all the lonely hearts
(Stand up)
Stand up if you're broken
(Stand up)
This is not Judgment Day
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:09 pm

05 Moves Like Jagger Maroon 5

A hippogryph was, in Keth's opinion, one of the most majestic animals alive. Part bird, part stag, it embodied the best of both creatures.

He whistled sharply, and his trained beast responded within moments. It came gliding over a hill with the sun flashing off bronze and azure feathers. It landed in a run, rushing right up to him and greeting him by rearing back in excitement, its wings flapping air into their faces, so close that Keth felt wing tip beat against him. Beside him, Kerala yelled in delight and hid behind him. He supposed he made a decent shield, as thin as she was, and only slightly taller than him. The animal settled, clacking its beak happily at him as it dug great furrows into the ground with each little happy hop.

“Oh, he's gorgeous!” Kerala exclaimed. Keth beamed. She walked slowly around him, approaching the hippogryph.

It stood slightly taller than them, twitching with constant movements like a nervous bird. The beak was a glistening ebony, straight and triangular. Stag horns protruded up from the crest feathers, but otherwise the whole front was all beautiful bird. A deep rich blue on top, the underside was feathered in an equally striking bronze, both colors shining with a slight iridescence. The front legs were rough blue bird claws, each toe ending in wickedly sharp black talons. Great wings were folded to either side, ending in giant black feathers on the trailing edge. The rear of the hippogryph was a dark dappled stag, furred in a black that shined with blue in sunlight, revealing the pattern. It's long tail was flanked to either side by a flexible long blue feather.

Keth offered the hippogryph a hand filled with seed. The hippogryph greedily seized his entire hand in its beak, gently shaking the seeds off onto its tongue with pulling motions that jolted his arm. Keth laughed and withdrew his hand.

“Do you want to ride him?” The question surprised Kerala, who was stroking the smooth feathers in awe.

“Will he mind?” she asked. She stopped the petting motion, and the hippogryph shifted weight to lean his neck against her.

“ I think he likes you, actually. Probably more than me.” The hippogryph clacked its beak amiably at them both.

“I would love a ride.” she told him.

He grinned and stepped up close to her. “Let me help you on.” He gently put his hands around her waist and lifted, not really expecting that it would be so easy to lift her. She clutched at his shoulders, and then scrambled to get her leg over the hippogryph's back without kicking him. “Don't grab his feathers,” Keth warned, “He hates that.”

After moment, the two were settled with each other. Keth went to the back of the beast, patting its rump to keep it from startling. He then hopped once, and on the bounce he lifted himself into position behind Kerala. He scooted forward against her, realizing only then that the difference in height would be a problem, for he was staring at a mass of curls in front of him, unable to see around.

“Erm, well I'm reasonably certain he won't run into anything, but I forgot how tall you are. Don't steer him into a tree.”

Before she could be too concerned, Keth wrapped his arms around her tiny waist and gently put pressure to the hippogryph's sides. Their mount obliged by starting a slow walk. It's gait was smooth and fluid, but he noticed that Kerala was stiff. He was pretty sure she'd never ridden a hippogryph before, but he'd not thought she might be afraid of being on it.

“Are you alright?” he asked her. “Is this silly beast walking right at a tree already?”

Keth was worried that he'd really scared her when she didn't answer at first, but then “No, no he's fine.” She took a deep breath, and Keth felt the sharp lines of her ribs expand and then settle. “I'm not used to being touched.”

“Oh.” Keth said. Then, “OH!” as the words sank in. He released her quickly, mentally kicking himself for being so thoughtless. “Is that better?” A slight shaking of her back meant she must have nodded, and he could feel her relax a little bit against him.

They walked along for a few minutes, and Keth could tell the hippogryph was getting antsy. It wanted to GO.

“Alright, for flying, I'm going to need something to hold on to. May I grasp the back of your dress or something?” He was pretty sure grabbing her mane would be inappropriate.

“Could? ...Um.” She tried turning to both sides, unable to get a look at him. “You could hold me? I wasn't ready before.”

Keth slipped his arms gently back around her, grasping the hippogryph's mane rather than hugging her like before. He felt Kerala hesitate, and then she touched his hands, applying pressure. He let her move them up to circle her waist. She maintained contact for a moment, obviously trying to decide if this was really alright with her, and then she gave his hand a tiny squeeze and released a breath she'd been holding.

“Alright. Are you ready to fly?” he asked her.

“Yes!” exclaimed Kerala. “I'm so excited!”

Keth moved his feet to give the command for flight, and he was pretty sure the hippogryph never even felt his toes, springing into the air with a squawk of joy. The two rider lurched, one prepared, the other not. Kerala had a good grip on the hippogryph's mane, but that did not stop her from sliding backwards slightly along the hippogryph's back. Kethrenorean Forestwhisper could not contain the sound that escaped his lips as his tender parts were smashed with the bony tail of his companion.

Keth's world exploded temporarily. He simultaneously tightened his grip around Kerala, and threw his hips backwards in an attempt to escape the crushing pain. His vision went dim with points of light and darkness winking in and out of existence. He fought the urge to be sick as all of his muscles contracted at once.

The flight was short, and Keth was unaware of most it. The hippogryph did not run into any trees, he knew. He was also fairly certain that Kerala was ecstatic with the experience. He wasn't sure how he managed to dismount, but he helped her down, and despite his attempts to hide it, his distress must have still shown.

“Are you alright?” she asked, echoing his earlier query.

Keth nodded to her. “I like flying, but sometimes it doesn't like me back.” It was not a lie, and the hand that very dearly wished to cradle his injured parts stayed instead on his stomach, further cementing her perception that it was his stomach causing the trouble, and not what actually happened. “We can try again later. You need lunch, though, right?”

Kerala rolled her eyes, but nodded, glancing at the sun. “Alright. Can we fly again tomorrow?” She asked.

Keth nodded to her, and watched as she happily trotted over to the Warden who would take her to the infirmary for her midday meal. She waved back at him.

Keth waited until she was out of sight, and then promptly clutched himself, groaning, falling against the hippogryph.

Smooth moves, he thought.

Oh, yeah
Oh!

Just shoot for the stars
If it feels right
And aim for my heart
If you feel like
And take me away and make it OK
I swear I'll behave

You wanted control
So we waited
I put on a show
Now I make it
You say I'm a kid
My ego is big
I don't give a shit
And it goes like this

[chorus]
Take me by the tongue
And I'll know you
Kiss me 'til you're drunk
And I'll show you
All the moves like Jagger
I've got the moves like Jagger
I've got the moooooooooves like Jagger
I don't need to try to control you
Look into my eyes and I'll own you
With them moves like Jagger
I've got the moves like Jagger
I've got the moooooooooves like Jagger

Maybe it's hard
When you feel like you're broken and scarred
Nothing feels right
But when you're with me
I'll make you believe
That I've got the key

Oh
So get in the car
We can ride it
Wherever you want
Get inside it
And you want to steer
But I'm shifting gears
I'll take it from here (Oh! Yeah yeah!)
And it goes like this (Uh)

[chorus]

You wanna know how to make me smile
Take control, own me just for the night
And if I share my secret
You're gonna have to keep it
Nobody else can see this

So watch and learn
I won't show you twice
Head to toe, oooh baby rub me right
But if I share my secret
You're gonna have to keep it
Nobody else can see this (Ay! Ay! Ay! Aaay!)

And it goes like this

[chorus]
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

redeyedtreefr0g
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Posts: 110
Joined: March 25th, 2014, 7:35 pm
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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:11 pm

06 Everybody Talks Neon Trees

Whispers on the other side of the room suddenly distracted Kethrenorean from the distilling equipment arrayed before him. He was currently extracting the concentrated essence of a new type of thistle found growing in these wildlands. The researchers would want it to study and conduct tests. He'd already found that the thick juices had soothing properties and he was excited to find out more. His attention tended to absolute focus on whatever single task he was about, so it was surprising that he even knew that others shared the room with him at all or a hushed conversation was taking place.

After a moment, he understood why he'd been distracted.

“I heard she nearly tore the healer's arms off during one of those fever dreams.” said the first. “It's unnatural. How can she be so wasted physically and yet still nearly overpower one of us?” “

“And that healer isn't a slight little thing either. One of the most muscular females I've ever seen.” The second speaker Keth recognized. A snobby sort of man, the type who believed that the world kept turning based on the findings of his work alone. His tone implied that he'd like to see the lady healer's muscles working on an intimate level.

The first speaker shrugged. “I wouldn't want to make her angry at me.”

The snob laughed. “I wouldn't bet on you versus the starved heifer either. I heard she was a cannibal out there in the wastes with them ugly centaur. She'd eat you for breakfast and pick her teeth with the points of your ears.”

The two both snickered. Keth set his clipboard down with a wooden CLACK! on the table and strode from the room, leaving the other two botanists staring after him, suddenly silent.

He finally found her sitting alone on the island of the little pond on the northeastern edge of the wildlands. The Warden assigned to her stood in the shade a respectfully private distance away among the giant exposed roots of a tree.

A natural spring bubbled to the surface upland, the water pooling and then meandering to a ledge where two small waterfalls laughed as they leaped over. The resulting pool at the bottom was a pleasant spot now home to several varieties of fish. The schools attracted basilisks, who liked to stare into the clear waters waiting to snatch a meal, or lay stretched out soaking up the sun. The creatures were irritable things, prone to attack anyone that wandered too close. Keth didn't like them, and the feeling seemed to be mutual.

She was seated against the larger of two young trees, facing the twin waterfalls with her hooves folded up, hugging her bony knees. She wore a simple brown roughspun shift-dress. Leaning against the tree beside her was the genius intravenous staff contraption that was gently nursing her back to proper health. Three basilisks shared the island with her, one actually quite close to her. The thing hissed at him like a watch-beast as he stepped lightly through the shallow water. Kerala instantly turned to see who was there, and smiled, relaxing from her tense posture. She startled like that often, he noticed, always prepared to fight.

She was beautiful.

Dirt and grime washed away, the woman was a wonderfully chaotic jumble of colors and textures. Her fur was a variegated brown, the strands individually striped and also varying in tone all over her body forming color patterns that would have been intriguing on their own. Added to this, the coat was disordered as well, with little whirls and cowlicks all over. Atop all of that were the many lines and marks of scars, most of which were older, healed and hidden in the chaos. Still, there were more that stood out in stark hairless lines, still healing. Her mane had been mostly cut off by the healers. The hair was a darker brown, squiggly with a life of its own going every which way in curls and waves and frizz. Sunlight filtered through the tree to paint her dappled and set the whole fuzzy frame aglow around her face.

“Forestwhisper,” she said softly in greeting. Her Common was rough, broken and tainted with the dialect accent of the Magram. Her voice was quiet nearly a whisper.

Keth smiled back, bowing slightly. The basilisk hissed at him again, then stopped immediately when Kerala waved a hand at it. The beast eyed him a moment longer, as if considering the merits of stoning him with that gaze, then shuffled away to lay on the bank. It stretched out in the sunshine facing them.

“How are you?” he asked her. It was the way their conversations always started.

Kerala, as usual, did not answer. She turned her gaze back to the waterfalls, gesturing for him to sit beside her before her arm returned to its place around her knees. Keth took a seat. He sat quietly watching the water tumble, waiting for the question.

“Is this real?” she finally asked. Her bony fingers were stroking the fibers of the sack dress stretched over her legs as she stared out at everything.

Keth remained silent until she finally turned her sparkling green eyes to him. They were set too deeply in a serious, bony face. “You know it is.”

She blinked at him, her gaze full of doubt. Keth shrugged at her, and reached into his robes, to an inner pocket. He withdrew the cutting of a plant- a twig really, with slightly smushed oblong leaves and several small flowers. The stem was unbent despite it's ordeal being carried in a pocket, and the leaves and blooms were actually undamaged. A sturdy plant. The flowers, each with five rounded petals, were a clear dark green, shot through with a lighter, more vibrant green. The blooms stood out against the lighter foliage like little dark stars.

Keth held the flowers out to Kerala uncertainly.

She looked at them, then up at his face, and hers lit up in a grin. She took the cutting gingerly, admiring the color, touching the soft petals, smelling them. “Beautiful. What are they?”

Keth shrugged. “A play on the wild version of Steelbloom that grows out here. Learning about plants is what I do, and well, it's not that hard to make little changes.”

“You changed them? Why?”

Keth could not maintain eye contact, feeling suddenly shy beneath that intense regard. He shrugged again, stalling. The tactic failed utterly, for Kerala simply waited patiently. After several long moments, it was clear that she had no intention of letting him ignore the question. “I wanted to give you something special. These- they remind me of your eyes.”

Kerala looked at the flowers, more closely at the blooms. Finally she set them down on her knees, leaning back against the tree. “Thank you,” she told him. And then she yawned.

“They talk about you in the lab,” he said to her. “They say you stay up at night, that you don't sleep.”

“No.” she whispered. “I dream too much. They seem real, and then I wake. I'm afraid. What if this is the dream? I don't want to wake from this one.” She touched the flowers again, spinning the small plant.

“Well, do you ever see me in your dreams?” According to the healers, Kerala had no memory of him at all. She did not know how she'd come here from the mine, did not know that it was him and his friends who'd saved her.

Kerala thought for a moment. “No.”

“Well then, if I'm here, you'll know you're awake and not dreaming.” Kerala glanced at him, blinking slowly, and he recognized the fatigue now. “You need your rest. I can stay with you, if you like.”

“That sounds... nice.” she looked out at the waterfalls.

Keth smiled, happy that he could help her. “I can move my equipment, there isn't much I need. Or you can sleep in my lab. We could have a bed brought in. That would actually work well. I share that room with two other researchers. I don't much like them, they gossip too much, about everything.”

Keth was saying how, if he was going to be with her so often, maybe she wouldn't need a Warden to watch over her, and how he thought she would enjoy learning about the plants. When he glanced back at Kerala, though, her head was slack to one side, her eyes closed. Her arms were still tucked inside her knees. The flowers he'd given her were still in her hand hanging limply in a relaxed grasp.

Keth looked at the Warden standing in the shade, and shrugged. The man shrugged back. Keth stood and took the intravenous staff carefully in his hands, putting weight on it so that the base sunk into the ground firmly a few inches. It wouldn't accidentally fall. Then he sat back down closer to Kerala against the small tree. If she moved, it should wake him. He closed his eyes, listening to the rushing of the waterfalls.

Hey baby won't you look my way?
I can be your new addiction
Hey baby what you gotta say?
All you're giving me is fiction
I'm a sorry sucker and this happens all the time
I found out that everybody talks
Everybody talks, everybody talks

[chorus]
It started with a whisper
And that was when I kissed her
And then she made my lips hurt
I can't even chitchat
Take me to your love shack
Mamas always gotta backtrack
When everybody talks back

Hey honey you could be my drug
You could be my new prescription
Too much could be an overdose
All this trash talk make me itching
Oh my my shit
Everybody talks, everybody talks
Everybody talks too much

[chorus]

Never thought I'd live to see the day
When everybody's words got in the way

Hey sugar show me all your love
All you're giving me is friction
Hey sugar what you gotta say?

[chorus]

Everybody talks
[x4]
Everybody talks... back

It started with a whisper (everybody talks, everybody talks)
And that was when I kissed her (everybody talks, everybody talks)

Everybody talks
Everybody talks... back
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

redeyedtreefr0g
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Posts: 110
Joined: March 25th, 2014, 7:35 pm
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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:13 pm

07 Don't You Worry Child Swedish house Mafia

Kerala bent over the giant book on Northrend herbs, struggling to read with a skill that was still anything from adept. She tried to read silently, but it was not something she found herself able to do. She had to speak the words, to sound them out, in order to figure out how the letters added up to make a word.

It was tedious, and boring.

Alfirin had been a fantastic teacher though. She was patient and kind, and had explained things so well. Kerala rather thought she'd been able to learn so much in one afternoon due to the skill Alfirin had at teaching, rather than her own ability to grasp a new concept. In one afternoon, Kerala knew enough to at least identify most letters and recall the way they should sound. It was the combinations that kept throwing her- things like double vowels, that aggravating silent E, and the strange combinations of T and H or C and H.

And then there were these silly words where the letters were doubled for no reason. She studied the word, recognizing the W and the O. The letter on the end Would sound different than normal, being on the end.

“Woo, Woor.... Woorya. No, Wooryee. Woh Ree. Worry. 'The rose is a calming flower, able to enhance.... whatever THAT says... lift the spirit, and calm fears and worry.'” Kerala needed a moment to think that over. “Gee, that sounds a pretty useful flower.” She thought about how often she could have used a no-nightmare potion over the recent past. She briefly wondered if she could go find those roses and use them to get into the Undercity library. Her love was not in plants, though, but the shining secrets of stone and mineral.

Kerala closed the book, deciding that it was time for a break. Her neck ached from bending over the pages, even though she'd tried holding the book up. So far there was no comfortable position she'd found to read in. She stood and stretched, forgetting the low ceiling and smacking her hands on the roof. The air smelled of moisture, and so she decided to go out and watch the rain. She made her way carefully past the stone guardians, smiling at them even though they gave no indication that they ever noticed her at all.

Her thoughts were still of that rose flower, on the last word that she'd deciphered: worry. She thought of Alfirin's question about religion. The picture of the rose made her think of another flower she'd held once, with special meaning, in a different life. Thinking of that time, her mind wandered further back, to her father. She reached the entrance to her cavern home and looked out, but her eyes didn't really see the rain that she loved so much.


She'd been eleven when they'd been captured.

It seemed so long ago, and yet just like yesterday. She remembered that she'd had a family- a mother and a sister, but she no longer recalled their faces, what they looked like. She saw her father, though.

She remembered his stern blue eyes. How his brown coat was so dark it was almost black. She recalled how he fought, a blur of motion with staff or spear, the curve of his back, his tail swishing to keep balance. She remembered the look in his face every time he kissed them good morning after guarding the tribe through the darkness of night.

She remembered trying to learn the songs and stories of the Shu'halo as they traveled, memorizing words and verses of history songs and teaching rhymes. It was much easier than learning to read.

“Da, if the Earth Mother still loves us after we made her so sad that she tore out her eyes, are you sure she isn't still mad at us?” she'd asked one time.

He'd chuckled in that deep belly-rumble of his. “Of course she is not angry at us. The Earth Mother is a good and kind mother. Does Ma stay angry at you when you do something bad?”

“Well, no.” Kerala had admitted. “But if She's not mad at us, then why doesn't She help us? Why does She keep letting the centaur come after us?

Her father had thought about that question for a long time as they walked, and Kerala had been afraid he wouldn't answer.

“What makes you think She is letting them act that way?” he finally asked. By his tone she knew that he had an answer, but he was going to make her figure it out.

“Well, they're still attacking us. If She's not letting them then why don't they stop?”

“You're not supposed to pinch your sister. Does that always stop you from doing it anyway?”

Kerala snorted, “No!” And then she realized her mistake. “But she's annoying! We didn't do anything to those dirty old horse-men.”

“Sometimes people are just so full of emotion that they can't help it. They haven't learned how to be nice like you have. Maybe in time the centaur will learn peace, and we can be friends.”

Kerala had frowned doubtfully, causing her father to laugh at her. “I don't think so, Da. But it's ok, I'm going to be a Brave like you, and if those smelly guys come to do bad things, I'm gonna point my spear at 'em, and say 'Look here, horse guys! We're not doing any harm, and you need to be nice!'” She nodded, happy with that plan. “And then when they don't, I'll show them how much it hurts to get whacked with a pointy stick.”

Her father smiled, “But I thought you were going to be a great shaman like your sister?”

Kerala just kicked at rocks on the ground. “She's fibbing anyway. She can't hear the elements any more than I can. But I'll bet she just needs to practice. I don't think any kind of practice is gonna make me into a leader, dad. I'm no good at it.” She thought for a minute. “I'm not real good with a stick either, actually.” Her voice took on a little bit of a whine, though she didn't mean to. “I'm not good at anything!”

Kerala's dad stopped and stepped away from the long line of travelers, pushing her with him. The passing tauren glanced at them curiously, but it was common for individuals to rest often and simply take their place further back in the line when they were feeling better.

“Kerala,” he dad said sternly. “You are good at something. Everyone is. You just have to find out what it is. It could be that you have to wait until you're done growing. Every day you grow another inch, and how is your poor body supposed to know how to balance itself when everything is constantly changing?”

When she still didn't look convinced, her face knelt down in front of her, eye to eye. “Don't you worry, child. The Earth Mother has a plan for you, and its a good one. But you have to have patience. Listen closely to the winds, and you will hear Her voice, as I do. Talk to Her. Ask Her for guidance if you need it. But do not doubt that you are important. We are all Her children, and no Mother ignores the children of her heart.”

Kerala had nodded, feeling a little bit better. They'd stepped back into the line near the end, and Kerala thought that when they struck camp that night, she would go to her sister and tell her she was sorry for all the times she'd pinched her. Maybe she'd brush out her hair and braid it for her. And together, they could practice listening for voices, whether they be the voices of elements, or deities.

* * * * * * * * * *

“Are you ready?!” Agiga yelled. “Hurry up those bones of yours! We'll miss the boat.”

“I'm coming!” The Forsaken child came rushing into the room, her mask in place and her new robes flowing behind her. The long black tresses were put up neatly into a large bun. “I'm all packed, can you get the case? I have to find Jubjub.”

“He's sitting there on top of your cloak, hurry put it on, the Cloudkisser isn't going to wait for us.” The small girl swished the cloak over her shoulders after shooing a giant toad off the folds of cloth. With a quick glance to Agiga, she stepped out the door and fairly floated down the steps, her light feet moved so fast. Agiga followed, her hooves clunking on each step. She still thought Aziris should have braided her hair into loops like Agiga did, it would have been cute to match. Oh well.

A quick flash of red and blue, and Agiga started, nearly falling down the last few steps in a reactive effort to not step on the toad underfoot. “Jubjub! Frog legs are considered a delicacy in some cultures!” she yelled after it, watching the creature hop after Aziris.

It was not the chore Agiga expected to get the undead horse onto a giant floating boat. Aziris had said it was a specially bred animal, but still it was difficult to believe how it responded so well to a voice command.

“Do you really think I can be useful in Northrend, Agiga? I don't want to be in the way.”

Agiga smiled at the strange little child. “Of course you won't be in the way. I've never seen any Forsaken wield the light of An'she like you can. You're as good as any tauren seer I've seen, and your race isn't even supposed to have the ability, I've heard. It causes you pain?”

“Oh yes,” Aziris nodded. “But it's ok.”

“I'm sure you'll make a great healer. We always stay in the back, behind all the strong warriors. They protect us, and we keep them strong and protect them in turn. I'll bet we make a great team.”

“I don't know...” Aziris said. Her bony fingers rubbed at her arm, where Agiga had healed the latest break.

“Don't worry child, I'll be there right next to you. Besides, maybe we'll find a better a way to strengthen those brittle bones of yours. Wouldn't that be amazing?” Aziris nodded reluctantly, her golden eyes still full of uncertainty. Agiga knelt next to her, face to tiny face.

“You remind me of my sister, small one. She was always questioning herself, whether she was good enough. My father used to have to sit her down all the time. He'd say 'Don't you worry, child. The Earth Mother has a plan for you, and its a good one.'”

“Was it true?” Aziris asked.

Agiga sighed. “My sister gave her life to save mine. She must have thought the plan was good enough.”

Aziris looked at Agiga, and then she very gingerly placed her arms around the thick neck of her friend in the best version of a hug she could give. Agiga was careful to stay still, and when the fragile child released her, they stood at the railing together, silent, watching for their first glimpse of a strange cold new land.

There was a time
I used to look into my father's eyes.
In a happy home
I was a king, I had a golden throne.
Those days are gone,
Now the memory's on the wall.
I hear the songs
From the places where I was born.

Upon a hill across a blue lake,
That's where I had my first heartbreak.
I still remember how it all changed.
My father said,

[chorus]
"Don't you worry, don't you worry, child.
See heaven's got a plan for you.
Don't you worry, don't you worry now."
Yeah!
[x2]

There was a time
I met a girl of a different kind.
We ruled the world,
I thought I'd never lose her out of sight.
We were so young,
I think of her now and then.
I still hear the songs
Reminding me of a friend.

Upon a hill across a blue lake,
That's where I had my first heartbreak.
I still remember how it all changed.
My father said,

[chorus]

Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh!
[x3]

See heaven's got a plan for you

[chorus]

Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh!
[x3]

Yeah!
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

redeyedtreefr0g
redeyedtreefr0g
Posts: 110
Joined: March 25th, 2014, 7:35 pm
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Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:15 pm

08 Counting Stars One Republic

Kerala suddenly felt a sharp pain on her snout. She jerked away in reflex action, anger flaring at such a rude awakening. She was about to yell at her sister, when she realized that the silver form next to her was trembling. Her twin was having a nightmare.

Kerala sat up all the way and leaned on her sister, shaking gently. Her nose still stung. Her sister moaned, but didn't open her eyes. Kerala groaned.

“Agiga! You're dreaming, wake up!” She hissed. She tried not to talk too loud, lest she wake Ma and Da, sleeping on their mat just on the other side of the center pole. Failing, she sighed and pinched her sister. The soft tender flesh of an underarm was especially sensitive, as well as ticklish. Her sister woke with a small cry of pain, saw Kerala, and dissolved into tears, reaching for a her.

Kerala hugged her sister, patting her mane and trying to shush her, worried about the noise of her crying. She was surprised at how Agiga clung to her, squeezing as if Kerala was the only solid thing on earth. Kerala realized that sleep was not something they'd be returning to for a while. She carefully stood them up, and guided her sister outside.

The night was alive with light. Above them, countless stars twinkled. Musha's gaze was at it's widest, the bright soothing light almost making it easy to see around, just without color. Kerala's fur was a murky black in the night, while Agiga's silver coat shone. Kerala squashed the familiar stab of envy.

After she'd led them a good distance away from the tents of their parents and neighbors, Kerala stopped and just stood, holding her sister, who seemed to be finally regaining control over her breath. She stroked the soft braids, crooning wordlessly. It seemed to help. With a great shudder, Agiga took a last shaky breath, and finally moved to pull away. Oddly, Kerala didn't immediately let go, but satisfied her urge to squeeze tighter first. Then she let her sister go.

“Tell me,” she said simply.

Agiga's eyes went wide, wet and drowned-looking. “It wasn't a dream, it was real! I saw it.”

“You were asleep, it was a dream. What happened?”

“We died.”

Kerala almost laughed, except for the seriousness in her sister's whisper. She absolutely believed, and Kerala's sarcastic reply died a-borning.

Agiga looked at the moon suddenly, gauging the size. “Soon.” She sounded so scared.

“How?” Kerala asked.

“The tribes. They attack at dawn, Mu'sha is setting in the west, just above the horizon. The light in the east is blinding.” She looked in that direction nervously. “Da is sleeping, with us. Ma, she's up already, feeding the kodo... “

“It's so fast. There's no time to think. The hyenas come and I hear their snarls, their yipping. They bite at the kodos, and the kodos fight back. Some of them run. I hear Ma scream, and then she's quiet. She....” Her sister abandons that line of thought quickly. “Da grabs the spear, and he runs out. The centaur are everywhere, running all over. Loka's head gets smashed with an axe. One of the centaur gets sliced in the middle. All his guts fall out and he trips on them.” Agiga started breathing fast again, trying to talk fast to get it all out.

“Da is right outside the tent. He stabs a bunch and they die. He throws one into a fire. He tells us to follow him. You have that pointed stick you play with sometimes. Da tells us to run... you kill a hyena. You lose your stick after you shove it in a centaur's ribs.”

Agiga turned to stare at Kerala, an intense gaze that was unsettling in its focus. “We run, but it doesn't matter. There's no where to go...” She took another deep shaky breath. “It always ends the same.”

Kerala cocked her head, frowning. “You've had this same dream before?”

Agiga nodded. “A few times. Some things happen different...” she left unspoken that the opposite was also true. She was calmer now, but her anxiety was still obvious. She reached for Kerala's hand to hold, needing the touch.

Kerala squeezed the hand in hers gently. “What stays the same?”

Reluctantly, “Always dawn, always An'she blinding us and Mu'sha on the other side. Da always yells for us to run. And we always die. All of us.”

“Did you tell Ma and the Elders?”

“I told Ma, and she told them.” Agiga gritted her teeth. “They had a few extra Braves guarding us, for about a week. They say I'm too young to have real visions, and that it must be a night terror. I guess those are common for children our age trying to find our paths. They suggested I not try SO hard to hear the Earth Mother and the elements... to have patience.” She snorted, something Kerala had thought her prim sister never did.

Kerala frowned, considering what her sister had seen and sort of lived through several times. She tried to imagine watching her family dying, dying herself of some horrible wound. Her imagination was not that good, and she decided in this case it was a god thing. She was certain that visions had a purpose, however. If her twin was seeing them, there was a warning, somewhere.

“Well, I believe you, and I think these dreams are a warning. I'm not sure what they mean, but even knowing about them has to be better than nothing, right?” Kerala pulled her twin sister into another hug, aware suddenly that they probably didn't have much time together. “And if I can, I'll make sure we all don't die, ok?”

Agiga sniffed against her neck, and Kerala felt a nod before her sister buried her face in Kerala's mane in a tighter embrace.

How long they stood there, Kerala wasn't sure. Gradually, they became aware of various discomforts such as an aching arm held over a sister's shoulder too long. Without words, they agreed that trying to go back to bed was a useless endeavor. They lay down right there in the soft grasses staring up at the stars. Agiga, of course, remembered more constellations than Kerala did.

“That one there,” Agiga lifted her arm from Kerala's side, pointing, her voice a whisper, “that one I made up. It's actually part of the Wolf and Hunter, see? But if you take out those ones there, it looks like us. See, you have that glow on top, that's your fuzzy hair. And see that trail of tiny points? That's my hair.” She returned for arm to the warmth of it's place on Kerala.

Kerala stared for a minute, finding the faint glow, like a luminescent cloud so far away, and the line of stars But... “There aren't two of us, though. Just a big thing, like a two-headed ogre... maybe.” She squinted.

Agiga yawned and pushed against her in a mock-punch. “You have to imagine a little bit. I didn't say I was any GOOD at making up star-drawings.”

Kerala recognized the relaxed sign of fatigue in her twin. She suggested Agiga count the stars, saying every ten aloud. She had better eyesight than Kerala, it wouldn't be fair if they both counted. Kerala would miss some, she was sure. So, Agiga counted quietly, announcing a new group of ten perodically. After a while, she announced them with larger gaps between, and then she was repeating numbers somewhere around 630. Gradually, she felt quiet.

Kerala lay awake, thinking. She had always felt sort of odd praying to the Earth Mother, like it was a one-sided conversation that really should have two participants. Usually, because of that, she never asked for anything. How could you ask a question when the answer wouldn't be heard? She would thank the Earth Mother, tell her how she was sorry if she'd misbehaved, promised to do better.

Under the stars, Kerala prayed. She prayed hard. She asked the Earth Mother for guidance, advice, the knowledge to decipher the meaning of her sister's visions. She asked that the Earth Mother change the centaur's course to avoid their tribe. She asked for her family to be safe.

When the sky began to lighten, she was still awake, tense. She felt oddly vibrant, more alive knowing that her sister had seen them die and believed it would happen. The sky was more beautiful, full of colors. The smells of the grasslands were soothing and earthy. The crickets, normally a buzzing nuisance, almost seemed to have a melody.

But no, today was not the day. Mu'sha was still too far ahead, partly hidden beneath the jagged line of the horizon. Agiga was right, though.

Soon.

[chorus]
Lately I been, I been losing sleep
Dreaming about the things that we could be
But baby, I been, I been prayin' hard
Said no more counting dollars
We'll be counting stars
Yeah, we'll be counting stars

I see this life
Like a swinging vine
Swing my heart across the line
In my face is flashing signs
Seek it out and ye shall find

Old, but I'm not that old
Young, but I'm not that bold
And I don't think the world is sold
I'm just doing what we're told
I feel something so right
By doing the wrong thing
And I feel something so wrong
By doing the right thing
I couldn't lie, couldn't lie, couldn't lie
Everything that kills me makes me feel alive

[chorus]
[x2]

I feel the love
And I feel it burn
Down this river every turn
Hope is our four letter word
Make that money
Watch it burn

Old, but I'm not that old
Young, but I'm not that bold
And I don't think the world is sold
I'm just doing what we're told
And I feel something so wrong
By doing the right thing
I couldn't lie, couldn't lie, couldn't lie
Everything that drowns me makes me wanna fly

[chorus]
[x2]

Oh
Take that money
Watch it burn
Sing in the river
The lessons I learned
(x4)

Everything that kills me makes me feel alive

[chorus]
[x2]


Take that money
Watch it burn
Sing in the river
The lessons I learned
(x4)
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

redeyedtreefr0g
redeyedtreefr0g
Posts: 110
Joined: March 25th, 2014, 7:35 pm
redeyedtreefr0g

Re: Writing Challenge February 2014

Postby redeyedtreefr0g » March 25th, 2014, 10:19 pm

09 Wasting My Time Default

Walos Skyscream stared at the elf's back. There was really nothing else more interesting to look at. His shift on duty was nearly over, and Walos was glad of it. His stomach rumbled.

The stupid elf was just standing there, staring off in the direction that the strange Sister had flown off in. The woman he'd helped to save was gone from the Wildlands. Maybe now everyone would get back to work and quit wasting time. The constant threat of demons had been added to with naga, invading from the sea. This land was healing, but it was fragile and needed the protection of the Circle more than ever. They could not afford diversions.

Walos had watched the elf over the last few months. The man was entirely head-over-heels in love with the woman. It was odd. From what Walos could see, Kerala was one of the ugliest tauren women he'd ever seen. Well no, if it weren't for all the scars, her face would have been attractive, perhaps. He'd met many plainer women.

The elf had no idea of how to go about wooing a female, that much was clear. He was clumsy when he was nervous, and Walos had been quite amused on more than one occasion. His attempts at flattery fell flat on this savage foundling of the People. If she liked him back, Walos hadn't seen it. And now the object of Forestwhisper's devotion had just flown off on a hippogryph, leaving him standing there.

Staring at the heartsick botanist, Walos was glad he'd never fallen in love.

Well I don't want to see you waiting
I've already gone too far away
I still can't keep the day from ending
No more messed up reasons me stay

[chorus]
Well this is not for real
Afraid to feel
I just hit the floor
Don't ask for more
I'm wasting my time
I'm wasting my time
You can't stop the feeling
There is no reason
Let's make the call
And take it all again
Woah, again

Months went by with us pretending
When did our light turn from green to red
I took a chance and left you standing
Lost the will to do this once again

[chorus]

See you waiting
Lonesome, lonely
I See you waiting
I see you waiting

[chorus]
[x2]
FroggyCows#1399
Tauren: Lomani, Kerala, Anura, Coqui, Chanchu, Pipapipa, Heget
Undead: Aziris

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